Noncancerous testicular problems FAQ

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Noncancerous testicular problems FAQ

Post by ballbustingz7 on Sun Jan 24, 2016 12:21 am

Epididymitis, hydrocele, varicocele twist and are not a folklore group, these are the problems of the most common non-cancerous testicles.
Epididymitis
What is it?

An inflammation of the epididymis, the tube that carries sperm from the testicle to the penis. If the swelling affects the testis and epididymis, the condition is known as epididymo-orchitis.
What are the main symptoms?

Severe pain in the scrotum
A swollen area that can feel hot to the touch
Fever

What is the risk?

It is rare, though it is more common in children and has a peak onset in adolescence.
What are the causes?

In adults the condition may follow a viral or bacterial infection. Bacteria can sometimes find their way to the epididymis as a consequence of infection by common bacteria that cause urinary tract infections or other organisms such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Epididymitis can sometimes undergo vasectomy.
How can I prevent it?

The risk of epididymitis caused as a result of a sexually transmitted infection (STI) can be reduced by always practicing safer sex (eg using a condom during sex) and having regular checkups for STIs at a GUM (genitourinary medicine) clinic.
Should I see a doctor?

Yes I do. A urine test can diagnose the disease. Your doctor will make the diagnosis and rule out other potentially important conditions.
What are the main treatments?

Antibiotics (if it is a bacterial infection). You may also be advised to rest in bed, take analgesics (paracetamol or ibuprofen, for example), and even apply an ice pack on the scrotum.
How can I help?

Follow your doctor's orders and be patient - epididymitis may take several months to clear completely.
What are the prospects?

Good, though sometimes the scrotum remains somewhat enlarged.

Hydrocele
What is it?

Swelling in the scrotum, caused by accumulation of fluid in harmless bags surrounding the testicles.
What are the main symptoms?

A gentle and usually painless swelling of the scrotum. Sometimes the swelling may be as large as a grapefruit.
What is the risk?

Low.
What are the causes?

Accumulation of fluid in the scrotum, sometimes caused by injury to the testes or due to infection or inflammation.
How can I prevent it?

It is difficult to avoid, but protecting the testicles during sport or potentially risky work.
Should I see a doctor?

Yes I do. It is important to rule out more serious conditions.

The doctor will examine the testicles. He or she can also shine a light through the scrotum - the light passes through, it is probably a hydrocele.
What are the main treatments?

Usually, no, unless the swelling has become very big or uncomfortable. Hydrocele can be emptied using a syringe or, more commonly, surgery is used to remove all hydrocele. For men with small hydrocele and no symptoms, it is usually wise to leave well alone.
How can I help?

There is not much you can do.
What are the prospects?

The most severe cases can be treated permanently.

Torsion
What is it?

Each testis is suspended in the scrotum by the spermatic cord. This can become twisted, cutting off the blood supply to the testicle.
What are the main symptoms?

Sudden pain, very serious in one testicle
Swelling
Nausea and vomiting
Fever

What is the risk?

Low. It is most common in adolescent boys.
What are the causes?

Many cases have no known or obvious cause, although it may be related to physical activity. Some men, who naturally have more mobile testicles, are most at risk.
How can I prevent it?

You can not.
Should I see a doctor?

Certainly, really, definitely. In fact, torsion is a medical emergency - beyond the pain if the spermatic cord is twisted for a few hours a testicle may die due to lack of blood supply, and will then be removed.
What are the main treatments?

An operation to untwist the cord.
How can I help?

There is not much you can do.
What are the prospects?

Well, if the treatment is performed quickly.
Who else can help?

Do not waste time trying to find - you need to see a doctor as soon as possible.

Varicocele
What is it?

Essentially a varicose vein in the testicle.
What are the main symptoms?

Varicoceles are often painless and almost always located on the left testicle.
There may be swelling that is often described as feeling like a hot verse entanglement. This is usually most noticeable when you get up.
There may be a "drag feeling" in the testicle.
Fertility problems. It is believed that testicular overheating accumulation of blood and affects sperm production, although all men with varicocele are infertile.

What is the risk?

About 10-15% of men develop a varicocele.
What are the causes?

A damaged valve in the vein draining blood from the testis.
How can I prevent it?

You can not.
Should I see a doctor?

Yes I do. It is important to rule out more serious conditions.

Varicocele can usually be diagnosed by a manual review. A doctor may also shine a light through the testicle - varicocele will block the light. Small varicoceles can sometimes be diagnosed by ultrasound.
What are the main treatments?

Usually not, but if you are comfortable, you may be advised to wear support underwear.

If you have a fertility problem, however, it is possible to approach the varicocele with a variety of surgical techniques. A method increasingly used is known as embolization: small tungsten coils are inserted to block the veins leading to the varicocele.
How can I help?

There is not much you can do.
What are the prospects?

Good, but varicoceles can sometimes breed. The varicoceles treatment can result in a significant increase in fertility: improving the quality of semen occur in 50-90% of men.



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